New 4 star Amazon Review for “The Worker Prince”

This review took me to over 20 so the book will show up in more searches now, so that’s a real blessing, too.

4.0 out of 5 stars Gladiator, Moses, Skywalker, Rhii, July 25, 2012
Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)

It’s not that often that a science fiction story bordering on space opera comes along that everyone will enjoy reading. That’s what Schmidt accomplishes with the Worker Prince. Revolving around a recent graduate prince who leaves home for his first assignment only to discover his slave-class origins, the story mirrors that of the Biblical Moses in many aspects.

While the main protagonist, Davi Rhii, does not spend 40 years in the dessert, he does wrestle with identity issues and the status quo of an empire built on the back of slave labor. The conflict that ensues is the classic story of one against the many. The result is watching an individual discover his unique place, and this is something most of us long for in our own lives.

Schmidt finds a nice balance between moralizing and adventure in his tale that I thought suited anyone between the ages of 13 and dead.

That being said, it didn’t hit the sweet spot for me. I prefer a little more grime and grit in my space opera. Rhii is a champion and hero more along the lines of Luke Skywalker (without all the whining) and less like Han Solo. But the prose is elegant and well-paced.

If you enjoy young adult literature, coming of age tales, and/or science fiction adventure then you’ll enjoy The Worker Prince. Read it! Review it! Share it!

The Worker Prince, My First Novel, Comes to NetGalley For A Limited Time

It rarely happens. While NetGalley is a goto place now for reviewers and others to get advanced looks at forthcoming books, it’s also expensive and thus, dominated primarily by bigger publishers and authors who have the cash to spend on it. Color me surprised when, in July, I was given a special one time opportunity to get my debut novel, The Worker Prince, listed there. While the listing is for around a month only, it’s a great chance to have a book named Honorable Mention by Barnes & Noble Book Club’s reviewer Paul Goat Allen on his Barnes & Noble Book Clubs Year’s Best SF Releases of 2011 out to more reviewers and, thus, more readers.

Within five minutes of the listing going live, we had five requests already. The listing can be found at http://netgalley.com/PopupHandler.php?module=catalog&func=galleyTitleDetails&projectid=19576 and is available in various ebook formats from .mobi and .epub to pdf and palm. Members of NetGalley simply need to search for it by name, click the More Info or Read Now links and then request their copy. It’s that simple. And as soon as my publicist sees it, she’ll approve it and you’ll be allowed to download it and read it.  Of course, we’re hoping you love it, but regardless, please review it. Not just at NetGalley but at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Goodreads and Library Thing.  Why? Not just because I’m asking or out of guilt for  a free copy, but because without reviews, authors and books like me and mine won’t survive. The number of reviews increases the number of people who find the book in searches, and also let’s them know a lot of people are reading it, giving them some idea of outside perspective on what it’s about and whether it’s worth their time, and that word of mouth, above all, is what sells books.

So, if you enjoy reading and free books, won’t you please consider taking advantage of this unique opportunity? The Worker Prince has been frequently compared to Star Wars: A New Hope. People say it captures the feel of the original Star Wars. It’s been compared to pulp and classic old fashioned space operas like Heinlein’s Starship Troopers or the Jason January tales. And it’s garnered praise from authors like Brenda Cooper, Maurice Broaddus, Mike Resnick, David Lee Summers and more.

Here’s the teaser:

What if everything you thought you knew about yourself and the world turned out to be wrong?

For Davi Rhii, Prince of the Boralian people, that nightmare has become a reality. Freshly graduated from the prestigious Borali Military Academy, now he’s discovered a secret that calls into question everything he knew about himself. His quest to rediscover himself brings him into conflict with his friends and family, calling into question his cultural values and assumptions, and putting in jeopardy all he’s worked for his whole life. One thing’s for sure: he’s going to have to make decisions that will change his life forever…

It’s a space western fantasy, epic space opera with great action, space battles, family drama, political scheming, and a bit of romance. Based in part on the Moses story, but also original and takes off from that story into different directions. It’s family friendly and has been enjoyed by 8 year olds and readers in their 70s. It’s 326 pages, trade paperback at $14.95. Released October 4, 2011 from Diminished Media.

I think this is an exciting opportunity for us both. I hope you’ll agree. And if you like it, book 2 is out, too.


Bryan Thomas Schmidt is the author of the space opera novels The Worker Prince, a Barnes & Noble Book Clubs Year’s Best SF Releases of 2011  Honorable Mention, andThe Returning, the collection The North Star Serial, Part 1, and several short stories featured  in anthologies and magazines.  He edited the anthology Space Battles: Full Throttle Space Tales #6 for Flying Pen Press, headlined by Mike Resnick. As a freelance editor, he’s edited novels and nonfiction.  He’s also the host of Science Fiction and Fantasy Writer’s Chat every Wednesday at 9 pm EST on Twitter under the hashtag #sffwrtcht. A frequent contributor to Adventures In SF PublishingGrasping For The Wind and SFSignal, he can be found online as @BryanThomasS on Twitter or via his website. Bryan is an affiliate member of the SFWA.

Book Day Two: The Returning Comes To Print!!!

Well, paperbacks are finally here, so this is Book Day 2 for the exciting sequel to The Worker Prince, which made Barnes & Noble Book Club’s Year’s Best Science Fiction Releases of 2011!  Mitch Bentley of Atomic Fly Studios did some of his best work ever on the cover. Sorry again for the delay, but we’re excited to bring it to you and hope you are too! You’ll love this book. Hugo/Nebula award winner Mike Resnick even blurbed it, as you see on the cover.

The Vertullians are free and have full citizenship but that doesn’t mean they’re accepted. Someone is sending assassins to kill and terrorize them, riling up the old enmity all over again, while Xalivar is back seeking revenge on Davi and all those who defied him. Davi, Farien and Yao reunite to investigate the murders, finding their lives and friendships threatened by what they discover.

Meanwhile, the new High Lord Councilor, Tarkanius, Lord Aron, and Davi find themselves fighting all over again to preserve the unity of the Borali Alliance, while even many of their allies and friends work against them to tear it apart. Davi and Tela find their future together threatened by difficulties with their relationship, and Miri’s adjusting to her new status as a non-royal. The action packed, emotional, exciting Davi Rhii story continues.

The Returning has romance, assassins, tension, both modern and classic science fiction notions, and very smooth writing. What more could you want? Bryan Thomas Schmidt keeps improving. As good as The Worker Prince WAS, The Returning is better.” – Mike Resnick, Author, StarshipIvory

The Returning blends themes of faith with classic space opera tropes and the result is a page-turning story that takes off like a rocket.” – Paul S. Kemp, Author, Star Wars: RiptideStar Wars: Deceived

“A fun space opera romp, complete with intrigues, treachery, dastardly villains, and flawed but moral heroes.” – Howard Andrew Jones, Author, The Desert Of SoulsPathfinder Tales: Plague Of Spells.

To celebrate, we have the books continuing at 33% off signed from this site only. YEP, including ebooks, which I sign through Kindlegraph (don’t worry, still works for Nook). And if you buy the book elsewhere, use the contact form to send me your address and I’ll mail you a signed bookplate for free.

 Trade paperback Special discount this week only! 


Ebook – MOBI/EPUB Special discount this week only! 

340 pp · ISBN 978‐0‐9840209‐4‐2 ·Trade Paperback · $14.99 tpb $7.99 Ebook  · Publication: June 14, 2012

Or buy it at Amazon here: http://www.amazon.com/The-Returning-Bryan-Thomas-Schmidt/dp/0984020942/ref=tmm_pap_title_0?ie=UTF8&qid=1341255149&sr=8-3

Or Barnes & Noble here: http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-returning-bryan-thomas-schmidt/1108892375?ean=9780984020942

Or Smashwords here: https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/175177

For interviews and more fun, check out the current Blog Tour.

Here’s what people said about the first book and links to reviews of book 2.

Praise for The Worker Prince:

“A significant new author in the field of space opera – Bryan is a fresh new imagination to watch out for!”— Grace Bridges, author of Faith Awakened and Legendary Space Pilgrims

“Retro-with-a-twist SF brimming with an infectious enthusiasm!” — Saladin Ahmed, author Throne Of the Crescent Moon

“If your reader’s heart longs for the Golden Age of Science Fiction–when good was good and bad was bad, and great characters fought against universal odds–then The Worker Prince is for you. Good, retro fun for the whole family.”— Jason Sanford, author Never Never StoriesInterzone

“I found myself thinking of stories that I read during my (misspent) youth, including Heinlein juveniles and the Jason January tales, as well as Star Trek and Star Wars.”— Redstone SF 

“A very well written book and a story very well told…where the heroes are heroes and the villains are villains. I would highly recommend it even if you are new to Sci-Fi.”—Ben Love, Call FM, Miami

Reviews:

http://functionalnerds.com/2012/06/review-the-returning-by-bryan-thomas-schmidt/

http://oddengine.wordpress.com/2012/06/04/review-the-returning-by-bryan-thomas-schmidt/

http://vantiltool.blogspot.com/2012/05/bryan-thomas-schmidt-publishes-second_02.html 

To find The Returning on Barnes & Noble’s website, click here.

To find The Returning on Amazon’s website, click here.

About Me:

Bryan Thomas Schmidt is the author of the space opera novels The Worker Prince, a Barnes & Noble Book Clubs Year’s Best SF Releases of 2011 Honorable Mention, and The Returning, the collection The North Star Serial, Part 1, and several short stories featured  in anthologies and magazines.  He edited the anthology Space Battles: Full Throttle Space Tales #6 for Flying Pen Press, headlined by Mike Resnick. As a freelance editor, he’s edited a novels and nonfiction.  He’s also the host of Science Fiction and Fantasy Writer’s Chat every Wednesday at 9 pm EST on Twitter under the hashtag #sffwrtcht. A frequent contributor to Adventures In SF PublishingGrasping For The Wind and SFSignal, he can be found online as @BryanThomasS on Twitter or via his website. Bryan is an affiliate member of the SFWA.

 

Happy Book Day, Paper Baby Two! (The Returning Released)

There’s something about the release of a second novel that’s really special. Despite having edited an anthology this year, adding another book to the roster, especially in the same series and another original just makes you feel like you’ve proven yourself all over again. Not just a one book wonder, so to speak, but here to stay, it says. And so, with pride, I welcome another paper baby into the world.

Book 2 in my Saga Of Davi Rhii, The Returning follows The Worker Prince in sequence and yet improves on it in many ways. It’s not the coming of age story of the first book, but an all new story with unrelenting action and a thriller feel.

My beta readers all said it was better. And I’m very proud to have three good friends’ endorsements: Mike Resnick, Paul S. Kemp and Howard Andrew Jones as well as positive reviews so far from Functional Nerds, Odd Engine, and more.

Welcome to the world, paper baby number two. I hope your adventure and life takes you places I’d never imagined and I hope we both can enjoy the ride!

For full book info including review links and blurbs, click here.

340 pp · ISBN 978‐0‐9840209‐4‐2 ·Trade Paperback · $14.99 tpb $7.99 Ebook  · Publication: June 14, 2012


 Paperback 33% off this week only! $10.11
 Ebook-EPUB/MOBI 33% off this week only! $4.99

Bryan Thomas Schmidt is the author of the space opera novels The Worker Prince, a Barnes & Noble Book Clubs Year’s Best SF Releases of 2011 Honorable Mention, and The Returning, the collection The North Star Serial, Part 1, and several short stories featured  in anthologies and magazines.  He edited the anthology Space Battles: Full Throttle Space Tales #6 for Flying Pen Press, headlined by Mike Resnick. As a freelance editor, he’s edited a novels and nonfiction.  He’s also the host of Science Fiction and Fantasy Writer’s Chat every Wednesday at 9 pm EST on Twitter under the hashtag #sffwrtcht. A frequent contributor to Adventures In SF PublishingGrasping For The Wind and SFSignal, he can be found online as @BryanThomasS on Twitter or via his website. Bryan is an affiliate member of the SFWA.

 

Review: Why You Should Read Sam Sykes Aeons’ Gate Trilogy from Pyr

I don’t do reviews here very often. And this will likely be a bit more of an essay than a review (fair warning). But the reasons are complex. As a fellow writer and professional who is friends or (at least) acquaintances will a lot of other professionals/ writers, I know how hard writers work and how hard bad reviews can be to hear. I also, generally, try and stay mostly positive on this blog, so negative reviews don’t add to that. Plus, if I don’t feel I can compliment the writer and book, there’s a risk of alienating people from Science Fiction and Fantasy Writer’s Chat or in my professional network, and I’m just not at the point where I feel that’s worth the risk or a good move for my career.

That being said, you should also know Sam Sykes is a friend. We have only met in person once, two years ago at World Fantasy in Columbus, Ohio. But we have talked online and emailed back and forth and even scuffled over one of my Adventures In SF Publishing posts when we disagreed. We do it with respect and admiration (at least on my part). There’s still a lot we don’t know about each other. We don’t share the same worldview, but we do have a mutual respect and that transcends differences.

Okay, enough disclaimers.

Because if you have not read Sam’s Aeons’ Gate trilogy from PYR, you really should. I reviewed the debut here (Tome Of The Undergates), and I read the Middle book last year and put it on my popular 70 Most Memorable Science Fiction and Fantasy Books I’ve Read To Date post. But you shouldn’t read this series just because of those things, nor because he’s my friend. The two best reasons to read them are: 1) Sam Sykes is one of the most inventive fantasy writers to come along in a while. And 2) Sam Sykes is an example of an author growing as he writes in a way that is both encouraging and inspiring to writers.

If you’re not a writer, the second reason may be of little interest, but since my blog tends to cater toward the creative crowd, I’ll stand by that as a significant thing. In his first book, Tome, there was a rawness and roughness that showed it was a debut. Much like my own debut. In Black Halo, the second book, he moved a bit beyond with his craft, developing his world, characters and even style a bit more in areas where it had been criticized in the first book. However, the book suffered a bit from feeling, as middle books often do, a little less focused and going off on some tangents which took the core characters to separate places, depriving us of some of the fun we had in Tome with their banter and internal conflicts. But now that I am fortunate enough to get a sneak peek at The Skybound Sea, volume 3 in this sword and sorcery saga, I can say with confidence that Sykes is really starting to come into his own.

The Skybound Sea is an even better read than the first two. Although the group gets separated again, Sykes wisely brings them together early on and then again for the climax. The groupings are a bit different this time and aid in the development of subplots involving the character relationships. I have to be careful what I say, because I don’t do spoilers, but those awaiting a satisfying Lenk-Kataria connection will probably be most pleased with how that storyline develops and yet, even saying that feels fair because it develops in ways that are not predictable and which demonstrate Sykes’ inventiveness.

At the same time, the world-building here really steps up a notch, especially in terms of inventiveness. Sykes is not writing typical fantasy or sword and sorcery here in regards to characters or settings, in particular. I jokingly teased Sykes on Twitter that ” I’m pretty sure when @SamSykesSwears wrote The Isle of Jaga sequences mushrooms were involved of a hallucinatory variety. Just saying.” But Jaga is an amazing world with some startlingly unique aspects. And no, I can’t tell you without spoiling the fun, so I won’t. But half of this book takes place there, allowing plenty of time for its many aspects to be revealed and play a part in the story. Sykes uses the setting here, more than in either prior book, as a character. And that’s what I mean by watching him grow. He did an ample job with setting and description from the start, don’t get me wrong. But the milieu was less important than other factors much of the time. Here, in Skybound Sea, the milieu almost becomes inseparable from events, so significant is its role. And thus, like Tolkein’s Middle Earth, Sykes’ world because as inherent to his story as the characters and themes.

Another point of growth is the use of lots of bodily functions in Tome, particularly during the opening battle. Those elements don’t disappear entirely in later books, but, in The Skybound Sea, they become far less prevalent and Sykes even manages to evoke humor in regards to past incidents of them from his characters. There’s a certain sophistication developing here for this young writer, one of the younger adult fantasy writers I’ve come across (mid-20s). And Sykes has plenty of book writing years ahead of him. So I’m quite certain we have a lot more to look forward to.

The Aeons’ Gate trilogy is the tale of a band of ragtag adventurers led by Lenk,  a human with a mysterious past, who’s haunted by an internal voice that often argues with him, manipulates him, criticizes him etc. Aboard a ship attacked by froglike creatures from the depths, Lenk becomes caretaker of The Tome Of The Undergates, a magical book that holds the key to unlocking the Aeons’ Gate, a gate essentially between hell and earth. The frogmen are part of a conspiracy by demons (in essence) to set their master free to terrorize the earth again. When the tome is stolen, Lenk and his band are sent to capture it back and save the world. That road takes them into a lot of conflict and trouble they hadn’t counted on, encountering all kinds of various dangers and creatures along the way. The saga has lots of action, some romance, good interpersonal drama and politicking, some betrayal, scheming, magic, and good v. evil with some serious stakes. The characters are anti-heroes, but several possess a sense of moral core many antiheroes seem to lack these days. Ultimately, they may be flawed, but it’s understandable and their response to those failings is very admirable and believable.

One thing Sykes does here which is not so common is to really dig into the psychology of his characters. That means we go along with them to some dark places, which may be heavier than some readers would enjoy. But it also makes them more interesting, believable and real than a lot of characters because we see so much of the internal conflict behind their decisions. At times, I do think it can distract from pacing a bit, however, as I mention in the next paragraph, still, Sykes does this really well overall.

Are there weaknesses? Well, I’ve mentioned some in the first two books. There’s definitely some graphic violence here, although my contention is it serves the story and Sykes also gets better about how he uses that throughout the course of the trilogy. And the series is a bit dark, which may or may not be to your taste. But those aren’t genuinely weaknesses per se. Also, I found it a bit hard to envision characters until I got really further in. With book 3, the publishers finally include one of Lenk’s companions, and his love interest, with him on the cover with helps. I also found the netherlings and some of their co-antagonistic groups blended together a bit at times making them hard to distinguish. There are layers to all of them, and it wasn’t always easy to discern who’s who. I also felt some of the POV breaks using those characters didn’t add as much and slowed down the pace at times. However, those become minor quibbles in the end, because of the series’ overall strength.

The trilogy also holds the distinction of having one of the longest battle sequences I’ve ever read. I believe the first 100+ pages of Tome Of The Undergates all take place during the same battle. Sykes pulls it off in stunning fashion. In any case, I really think this is a series that fantasy fans young and old, new or ongoing will enjoy and should take the time to discover. And I have no doubt we are just hearing the first of many to come from Sam Sykes. Highly recommended.


Bryan Thomas Schmidt is the author of the space opera novels The Worker Prince, a Barnes & Noble Book Clubs Year’s Best SF Releases of 2011 Honorable Mention, and The Returning, the collection The North Star Serial, Part 1, and several short stories featured  in anthologies and magazines.  He edited the anthology Space Battles: Full Throttle Space Tales #6 for Flying Pen Press, headlined by Mike Resnick. As a freelance editor, he’s edited a novels and nonfiction.  He’s also the host of Science Fiction and Fantasy Writer’s Chat every Wednesday at 9 pm EST on Twitter under the hashtag #sffwrtcht. A frequent contributor to Adventures In SF PublishingGrasping For The Wind and SFSignal, he can be found online as @BryanThomasS on Twitter or via his website. Bryan is an affiliate member of the SFWA.

The Worker Prince Cover Is Here!!!

Designed by artist Mitch Bentley of Atomic Fly Studios, here’s the front cover for my debut novel, the space opera beginning of a trilogy. Mitch Bentley has designed art for Sam’s Dot Publishing, WolfSinger Publications and more. I met him in May 2010 at the ConQuest 41 convention art show and knew right then I wanted him to do the cover. So glad he did. He actually read the entire book before drawing this. I think he did a great job capturing the energy and Golden Age feel. (Click the photo to enlarge)