WriteTip: My Beta Training Checklist For Helping New Readers Provide Useful Feedback

A lot of people ask me how I recruit beta readers. And while I addressed7 Tips For Being Good Beta Readers in a prior post, I thought maybe sharing my Beta Training Checklist might also be helpful. The goal of the checklist is to help betas identify key types of problems they encounter throughout your book in a helpful way. In some cases, if they have notes to add, those are to be encouraged to clarify. Sometimes what they see as a problem, isn’t one. Other times, knowing their state of mind may help you narrow down a problem you couldn’t identify on your own.

For simplicity, the checklist is built on a lettering system, with each letter signifying the type of critique it is meant to provide. Without further adieu, here they are:

Instructions: Please use the following Checklist to identify any problems or issues you encounter in reviewing my manuscript. Mark the letter in the margin or in between lines at the spot the issue occurs. Feel free to use track changes to add additional comments and explanation if you feel they will be helpful.

Mark (A) For anywhere you feel Anger or some other emotion. Add a note if you feel the emotional reaction is not the one intended by the author.

Mark (B)  For anywhere you feel bored. If you are bored a lot, it needs to be addressed. Sometimes it just requires trimming, sometimes there’s a larger issue. If you have an idea what the issue is, feel free to add a note. If not, leave it to the writer to figure it out.

Mark (C) For anywhere you are confused and feel lost.

Mark (Q) For anywhere you have questions that you feel need to be answered and have not been. Keep in mind though that if intentional, the questions will probably be answered later as you keep reading.

Mark (G) For anywhere you laughed, smiled, or really enjoyed. These don’t necessarily require comments but they encourage the author and let them know they are connecting with you as intended in those spots and you are having some fun outside the various criticisms and issues you’ve identified.

Now some of you may think this is overly simple, but it’s designed to be that way. As they learn to read critically, beta readers’ notes will get far more complex and helpful. But starting out, you need to make it as easy as possible for them to learn how to provide helpful feedback. The five areas signified on the checklist should encompass the key problem areas betas will encounter in any manuscript. When employed, they should reveal most of what you need to address to make the book better. Once memorized, the letter coding should also help you prioritize them as you review the notes and employ them in revision.

Hope it helps. Happy writing!

For what it’s worth…

 

2 thoughts on “WriteTip: My Beta Training Checklist For Helping New Readers Provide Useful Feedback

  1. Interesting scheme. I like its simplicity.
    Clearly, the letters used are intentionally chosen for the associated meaning. This makes me wonder why “A” is used to mark a passage where the beta reader feels emotion. Why “A” rather than the more obvious choice of “E”?

    1. That’s a function of the fact I developed the checklist through trial and error with the last two letters being added when I saw the need over time rather than from the start, so originally it was just ABC. Now, of course, you could do it in your own checklist, but for me, I just left it as it was.

Leave a Reply to Brian Welte Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *